Black in El Paso



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Reblogged from blackacrylic
blackacrylic:

As Malcolm worked to identify African-American struggles with those of blacks worldwide, he found himself embraced by Third World Revolutionaries; these included General Abdulrahman Muhammad Babu, leader of the Zanzibar Revolution, shown here with Malcolm in 1964 - Malcolm X: A Life Of Reinvention [Manning Marable]

blackacrylic:

As Malcolm worked to identify African-American struggles with those of blacks worldwide, he found himself embraced by Third World Revolutionaries; these included General Abdulrahman Muhammad Babu, leader of the Zanzibar Revolution, shown here with Malcolm in 1964 - Malcolm X: A Life Of Reinvention [Manning Marable]

Reblogged from haitianhistory
haitianhistory:

Anténor Firmin, the first Haitian pioneer of the Négritude movement?

 ”Although Jean Price-Mars is usually credited with being the founder of “noirism,” and later Léopold Senghor hailed him as the “Father of Négritude” (Fouchard 1990), it is probable that Firmin and other illustrious members of Haiti’s nineteenth-century intellectual elite laid the primary foundation for what was to become the négritude movement. At least four of the twenty chapters of The Equality of the Human Races speak directly to the primary role played by the black race in world history and civilization, including “Egypt and Civilization,” “Intellectual Evolution of the Black Race in Haiti,” “Evolutionary Pace of the Black Race,” and “The Role of the Black Race in the History of Civilization.”A cursory reading not only of these chapters but of the entire tome re- veals Firmin to be “noirist” without arrogance or apology. Firmin attended the First Pan-African Congress in London in 1900 which W. E. B. DuBois also attended. Had he not been preoccupied with Haitian politics and a bid to become president as head of a Firminist movement, ending in his exile in St. Thomas by President Alexis Nord, Firmin might have continued this international involvement with the nascent Pan-Africanist movement.” 

Read full article here.

haitianhistory:

Anténor Firmin, the first Haitian pioneer of the Négritude movement?

 ”Although Jean Price-Mars is usually credited with being the founder of “noirism,” and later Léopold Senghor hailed him as the “Father of Négritude” (Fouchard 1990), it is probable that Firmin and other illustrious members of Haiti’s nineteenth-century intellectual elite laid the primary foundation for what was to become the négritude movement. At least four of the twenty chapters of The Equality of the Human Races speak directly to the primary role played by the black race in world history and civilization, including “Egypt and Civilization,” “Intellectual Evolution of the Black Race in Haiti,” “Evolutionary Pace of the Black Race,” and “The Role of the Black Race in the History of Civilization.”A cursory reading not only of these chapters but of the entire tome re- veals Firmin to be “noirist” without arrogance or apology. Firmin attended the First Pan-African Congress in London in 1900 which W. E. B. DuBois also attended. Had he not been preoccupied with Haitian politics and a bid to become president as head of a Firminist movement, ending in his exile in St. Thomas by President Alexis Nord, Firmin might have continued this international involvement with the nascent Pan-Africanist movement.”

Read full article here.

Reblogged from melanatedcontributions
melanatedcontributions:

Edward Wilmont Blyden, Educator, Scholar, Diplomat, Father of Pan-AfricanismEdward Wilmot Blyden, widely known as the father of Pan-Africanism, was born on August 3, 1832 in Saint Thomas, in what are now the U.S Virgin Islands. Blyden was the third of seven children and was born to Romeo and Judith Blyden, a tailor and schoolteacher, respectively. The family lived in a predominantly Jewish and English speaking community, and attended church at the integrated Dutch Reformed Church. Blyden’s parents were free and literate at a time when most blacks on the islands were enslaved and illiterate. In 1842, the family moved to Porto Bello, Venezuela where Blyden first discovered his facility with languages. He also found that black free Venezuelans performed much the same menial labor as enslaved blacks in the Virgin Islands. Upon the family’s return to Saint Thomas Blyden became a student of Rev. John P. Knox, the pastor at the Dutch Reformed Church. Rev. Knox, impressed with Blyden’s scholarly potential, his mentor and through him Blyden decided to become a clergyman. In May 1850, Blyden accompanied Mrs. Knox, the clergyman’s wife, to the U.S to enroll into Rutgers’ Theological College in New Jersey but was refused admission because of his race. Blyden turned his attention to Africa. The West African nation of Liberia had become independent in 1847. Blyden accepted an offer in 1850 to come to Liberia to teach. Soon after his arrival in January 1851, Blyden was employed at Alexander High School in Monrovia. There he began self-directed studies of theology, the classics, geography and mathematics. In 1858 Blyden was ordained a Presbyterian Minister and appointed Principal of Alexander High School. He was also appointed editor of the Liberian Herald, then the only newspaper in the nation, by Liberian President Joseph Roberts. Drawing on both scriptures and science, Blyden challenged the arguments about black inferiority that were increasingly popular in Europe and North America during this period. He argued black equality and used examples of little known but successful persons of African ancestry. Between 1856 and 1887 Blyden authored four books, A Voice From Bleeding Africa (1856); A Vindication of the African Race; Being a Brief Examination of the Arguments in Favor of African Inferiority (1862); Africa for the Africans (1872); and Christianity, Islam and the Negro Race (1887) as well as numerous articles to advance his case.Blyden also challenged black and mulatto elites in Liberia who hoped to monopolize political power. During the 1860s and early 1870s Blyden was Liberia’s Secretary of State and Professor of Classics at Liberia College. From these posts he called for the emigration of skilled and intelligent Black West Indians and African Americans to Liberia. Not surprisingly his proposals drew determined opposition from the Liberian elite. Nonetheless in 1885, Blyden ran for President of Liberia. After his defeat he went into self-imposed exile in neighboring Sierra Leone. Edward Wilmot Blyden died in Sierra Leone on February 7, 1912.

melanatedcontributions:

Edward Wilmont Blyden, Educator, Scholar, Diplomat, Father of Pan-Africanism

Edward Wilmot Blyden, widely known as the father of Pan-Africanism, was born on August 3, 1832 in Saint Thomas, in what are now the U.S Virgin Islands. Blyden was the third of seven children and was born to Romeo and Judith Blyden, a tailor and schoolteacher, respectively. The family lived in a predominantly Jewish and English speaking community, and attended church at the integrated Dutch Reformed Church. Blyden’s parents were free and literate at a time when most blacks on the islands were enslaved and illiterate. In 1842, the family moved to Porto Bello, Venezuela where Blyden first discovered his facility with languages. He also found that black free Venezuelans performed much the same menial labor as enslaved blacks in the Virgin Islands. 

Upon the family’s return to Saint Thomas Blyden became a student of Rev. John P. Knox, the pastor at the Dutch Reformed Church. Rev. Knox, impressed with Blyden’s scholarly potential, his mentor and through him Blyden decided to become a clergyman. In May 1850, Blyden accompanied Mrs. Knox, the clergyman’s wife, to the U.S to enroll into Rutgers’ Theological College in New Jersey but was refused admission because of his race. 

Blyden turned his attention to Africa. The West African nation of Liberia had become independent in 1847. Blyden accepted an offer in 1850 to come to Liberia to teach. Soon after his arrival in January 1851, Blyden was employed at Alexander High School in Monrovia. There he began self-directed studies of theology, the classics, geography and mathematics. In 1858 Blyden was ordained a Presbyterian Minister and appointed Principal of Alexander High School. He was also appointed editor of the Liberian Herald, then the only newspaper in the nation, by Liberian President Joseph Roberts. 

Drawing on both scriptures and science, Blyden challenged the arguments about black inferiority that were increasingly popular in Europe and North America during this period. He argued black equality and used examples of little known but successful persons of African ancestry. Between 1856 and 1887 Blyden authored four books, A Voice From Bleeding Africa (1856); A Vindication of the African Race; Being a Brief Examination of the Arguments in Favor of African Inferiority (1862); Africa for the Africans (1872); and Christianity, Islam and the Negro Race (1887) as well as numerous articles to advance his case.

Blyden also challenged black and mulatto elites in Liberia who hoped to monopolize political power. During the 1860s and early 1870s Blyden was Liberia’s Secretary of State and Professor of Classics at Liberia College. From these posts he called for the emigration of skilled and intelligent Black West Indians and African Americans to Liberia. Not surprisingly his proposals drew determined opposition from the Liberian elite. Nonetheless in 1885, Blyden ran for President of Liberia. After his defeat he went into self-imposed exile in neighboring Sierra Leone. Edward Wilmot Blyden died in Sierra Leone on February 7, 1912.

Reblogged from eatmangoesnekkid
eatmangoesnekkid:

My capacity to feel is what allows me to walk the earth typically in full blown arousal. But that arousal rarely has anything to do with another person or sex, more so my natural state of being. Another person simply adds to what already is. It makes me a lil bit ‘giddy’ sometimes to live outloud this way, but I am so attracted to my own brand of freedom.  In my forthcoming book “You Look Like Something Blooming” I share simple practical tips to assist women (or any person for that matter) in *coming alive* in their body temples.  -India Ame’ye (words and pictured)

eatmangoesnekkid:

My capacity to feel is what allows me to walk the earth typically in full blown arousal. But that arousal rarely has anything to do with another person or sex, more so my natural state of being. Another person simply adds to what already is. It makes me a lil bit ‘giddy’ sometimes to live outloud this way, but I am so attracted to my own brand of freedom.  In my forthcoming book “You Look Like Something Blooming” I share simple practical tips to assist women (or any person for that matter) in *coming alive* in their body temples.  -India Ame’ye (words and pictured)

(via remotely-viewing-khemet)

Reblogged from dynamicafrica

thefemaletyrant:

dynamicafrica:

Six Totally Unique Places to Visit in Africa:

The Big Pineapple
Bathurst, Eastern Cape, South Africa

If you’ve ever wondered where you can find the world’s largest artificial pineapple, your curious mind needn’t ponder anymore. Located about 55km from Grahamstown, the 16,7m-high attraction was created by members of the local agriculture community in Bathurst as a way of displaying their love for this tasty fruit as it grows in high abundance in the area.

Constructed and erected between 1990 and 1992, the Big Pineapple came into fruition on Summerhill Estate after a few of the local farmers went to the Sunshine Coast of Australia, saw their Big Pineapple, copied the idea and made an even bigger and better version.

Lake Reba/Lac Rose
Cap Vert Peninsula, Senegal

There aren’t many places in the world where you can see a pink lake. In fact, there are only two countries that host these incredible cotton candy-tinted waters. Aside from Australia’s Lake Hillier, Senegal’s Lac Rose is the only other of its kind in the world.

Less than an hour away from the capital city of Dakar, Lake Retba is separated only by some narrow dunes from the Atlantic Ocean. It gets its colour from Dunaliella salina, a type of algae that is attracted by the lake’s high salt content reaching as high as 40% in some areas. The bacteria produces a red pigment in order to absorb the sunlight which gives the lake its unique pink hue. Its saline content is comparable to that of the Dead Sea’s and exceeds it during the dry season (November to June). And yes, that means exactly what you think it does - you can float easy if you enter the lake.

Thanks to its high salt content, not many organisms can survive in the lake, which makes it useful for salt production. So if you visit the lake, you’ll also happen upon salt collectors in the area extracting this precious condiment from the bottom of the lake by hand. 

Chefchaouen
Chefchaouen, Morocco.

Rinsed in various hues of stand-out blues, this northwestern Moroccan city of ‘Chaouen’ (as it is often called by Moroccans) has become one of the most instantly recognized cities in the world, as well as a popular tourist destination. Yet, there is a rich history to the place that isn’t always as well known.

Situated in the Rif Mountains was originally founded in 1471, as a small fortress, by Moorish exiles from Spain, led by Moulay Ali Ben Moussa Ben Rached El Alami, to fight the Portuguese invasions of northern Morocco. It also became one of the few areas where Moriscos and Jews sought refuge in this mountainous city after the Spanish Reconquista in medieval times. In 1920, the Spanish seized Chefchaouen to form part of Spanish Morocco. With Morocco’s independence in 1956, the city was ‘returned’ and is known a part of modern-day Morocco.

The name of the area refers to the shape of the mountain tops above the town, that look like the two horns (chaoua) of a goat. “Chef Chaouen" derives from the Berber word for horns, Ichawen. The countryside around it has a reputation for being a prolific source of kief. The Chefchaouen region is one of the main producers of cannabis in Morocco. Hashish is subsequently sold all over town, but is mostly the domain of native Chaouenis.

Apparently, the town is painted blue to ward off mosquitoes.

The Rock Restaurant
Michanwi Pingwe beach, Zanzibar

It really isn’t hard to sell a place like this. What’s fancier than eating at a seafood restaurant atop a rock? I mean, you even have to take your shoes off before entering it. Whether you go for the food, location or both, it’s bound to be a memorable experience.

Avenue of the Baobabs
Menabe. Madagascar

One can only imagine that this place is as incredible as it looks. This dirt road between Morondava and Belon’i Tsiribihina in western Madagascar is lined and surrounded by majestic fort-like Baobab trees that are up to 800 years old and around 30 meters high. What’s more is that this particular species of baobab tree, of which there are nine in total, is endemic to Madagascar making the place all the more unique.

Meroë Pyramids
Shendi, Sudan

As much recognition, and deservedly so, that the pyramids of Giza, Egypt, receive, Sudan’s Nubian pyramids are a site to behold themselves. These architectural and archaeological feats are a testament to the greatness of the once formidable city of Meroë, the capital city of the now ancient Kingdom of Kush. From around
800 B.C. to 280 A.D., the Kingdom of Kush flourished and, influenced by Ancient Egypt, erected these pyramids as a way of burying their elite.

Although in various states of ruin, there are over 200 pyramids that are a combination of royal and non-royal tombs. It is a wonderfully complex site situated in North-East Sudan along the banks of the Nile River.

I was really excited to visit Lac Rose when I was in Senegal after seeing pictures such as the one above. Upon reaching Lac Rose I discovered that the lake is no longer pink! The guide explained that nature had taken it’s toll (the lake had been diluted with rainwater or something iirc), parts of the lack were pink but the vast majority was like any other body of water.

Maybe there are two Lac Roses in Senegal, sha the one I visited does not have pink waters.

(via remotely-viewing-khemet)

Reblogged from friendlycloud
friendlycloud:

Remarkable Women in History by Country: Sudan
Amanirenas
The Kingdom of Kush lay to the South of Egypt and is famous for its more pointed pyramids. Several Queens have ruled Kush, but one of the greatest is certainly Amanirenas. Ruling for about 30 years, she led her forces against the Romans in Egypt. After initial success, the Romans pushed back. A peace treaty was then signed, by terms favorable to Kush.
A contemporary of Cleopatra, Amanirenas was probably blind in one eye.
Masterlist of Countries: remarkable women in history

friendlycloud:

Remarkable Women in History by Country: Sudan

Amanirenas

The Kingdom of Kush lay to the South of Egypt and is famous for its more pointed pyramids. Several Queens have ruled Kush, but one of the greatest is certainly Amanirenas. Ruling for about 30 years, she led her forces against the Romans in Egypt. After initial success, the Romans pushed back. A peace treaty was then signed, by terms favorable to Kush.

A contemporary of Cleopatra, Amanirenas was probably blind in one eye.

Masterlist of Countries: remarkable women in history

(via remotely-viewing-khemet)

Reblogged from daughterofzami
daughterofzami:




Photograph: Jay-Z and Beyonce with Doug Morris, former CEO of Universal Music Group which owns Jay-Z’s Roc-a-fella records, Island Def Jam Records (formerly Russell Simons’ Def Jam) and current CEO of Sony Entertainment which owns Columbia records where Beyonce is signed. Doug Morris’ net worth nearly doubles that of Jay-Z. So who are the real owners of hip-hop?



"Despite the perception that Black entrepreneurs like P. Diddy, Russell Simmons, Jay-Z, Cash Money [or Young Money] are moguls, they are, in actuality, the children of their respective parent companies. P. Diddy’s Bad Boy Records is owned by Warner Music Group; Suge Knight’s Death Row by Interscope is owned by Universal Music Group; Def Jam is also owned by Universal… What’s worse is that, despite popular perception, there are no Blacks -none -in top executive positions of the parent companies. What the parent companies, as well as the Black moguls, would like us to believe is that “the R.O.C. is runnin’ this rap shit.” This why Jay-Z is touted as the ‘C.E.O of Hip-Hop.’ “- M. K. Asante, It’s Bigger Than Hip-Hop: The Post Hip-Hop Generation, p. 111-112

daughterofzami:

Photograph: Jay-Z and Beyonce with Doug Morris, former CEO of Universal Music Group which owns Jay-Z’s Roc-a-fella records, Island Def Jam Records (formerly Russell Simons’ Def Jam) and current CEO of Sony Entertainment which owns Columbia records where Beyonce is signed. 

Doug Morris’ net worth nearly doubles that of Jay-Z. So who are the real owners of hip-hop?
"Despite the perception that Black entrepreneurs like P. Diddy, Russell Simmons, Jay-Z, Cash Money [or Young Money] are moguls, they are, in actuality, the children of their respective parent companies. P. Diddy’s Bad Boy Records is owned by Warner Music Group; Suge Knight’s Death Row by Interscope is owned by Universal Music Group; Def Jam is also owned by Universal… What’s worse is that, despite popular perception, there are no Blacks -none -in top executive positions of the parent companies. What the parent companies, as well as the Black moguls, would like us to believe is that “the R.O.C. is runnin’ this rap shit.” This why Jay-Z is touted as the ‘C.E.O of Hip-Hop.’ “

- M. K. Asante, It’s Bigger Than Hip-Hop: The Post Hip-Hop Generation, p. 111-112

(via remotely-viewing-khemet)